Program Outline

Don't expect dry lectures, 20-page business plan exercises or theoretical frameworks.
Our practical methodology is based on having supported hundreds of companies enter China and involves a playbook with step-by-step instructions using case-studies, exercises and clear outcomes.

Click below for summaries and previews of each topic.


"Think of C3 as an 'all you can eat buffet', you choose what you want to learn, who you want to mingle with and what you want to get out of the program itself."

WILLIAM KOO  SALES AND OPERATIONS  KEEPSPACE

Module 1   Defining Your Mission



TOPIC 1   DEFINING YOUR PROBLEM

For any company, understanding the key problem you are solving is a fundamental first step. Entering a new market is usually difficult, particularly if there are also cultural issues associated with such entry.

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TOPIC 2   TARGET MARKET

In this topic, we aim to define in some detail the profile of typical Chinese customers (i.e. payer) and end users for your product or service. We explore location, users, end user attributes in B2C, B2B and B2B2C markets, and market adoption.



TOPIC 3   COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT

In order to better define your market positioning, we need to examine the competitive environment such as  major competitors in both domestic and foreign markets, their market shares, the structure of the market itself, product and service differentiation variables, and stages of market evolution.



TOPIC 4   MODIFICATION FOR THE CHINESE MARKET

Products and services differ in the degree to which they need to be modified for the Chinese market. Some, such as education services, gourmet food, or luxury goods, require little modification, as they are essentially being sold on the basis of their "foreignness". Others such as mass market fast food or furniture often require substantial modification.



TOPIC 5   COMPETITIVE STRATEGY

The markets for many products or services sold in China are often ferociously competitive, particular in B2C markets. Accordingly, foreign companies attempting to enter the market require a hypothesis as to how they will be able to compete, survive and make money.



TOPIC 6   TESTING PRODUCT-MARKET FIT

Developing or modifying your product or service for the China market can involve a lot of guesswork and potentially expensive mistakes. It would be useful if such risks and costs can be reduced as early as possible in the process of market entry.



Module 2   Selling & Getting Your Product to Customers



TOPIC 1   MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS AT THE TOP OF YOUR SALES FUNNEL 

The customer acquisition process in China has clear analogies with the same processes in other economies, such as Australia. We explore customer acquisition tools and look at key differences within Chinese marketing. We also explore the significance of WeChat and Key Opinion Leaders (KOLs).



TOPIC 2   SALES AND DISTRIBUTION

Sales and distribution in China are similar but also very different than in advanced economies. This section of the module aims to explore these issues and provide stimulus for C3 members to set out a hypothesis as to how they will sell and distribute their products or services in China.



TOPIC 2.1   DAIGOU

Daigou (a Chinese term for "on behalf of"), emerged in the 2008-2010 period as a major new distribution channel for the sale of smaller non-perishable goods to China-based consumers. Over time this simple business system has evolved and today there are said to be around 100,000 daigou in Australia of whom around 15,000 generate significant personal income.



TOPIC 2.2   ONLINE SALES PLATFORMS

There are multiple largescale online marketplaces in China. The three largest marketplaces include Taobao for C2C sales, Tmall for B2C sales, and Alibaba for B2B sales.



TOPIC 2.3   DISTRIBUTORS

Whether you be in B2B, B2C, or B2B2C markets, one of the distribution and sales models you will consider when entering the China market will be the appointment of a distributor(s).



TOPIC 2.4   DIRECT SALES - OWNING YOUR OWN PHYSICAL SALES OUTLETS

Very few smaller foreign firms think of owning or franchising their own sales outlets. Yet, historically in China, there are examples of foreigners who have established multiple site retail operations. Among larger firms, the conspicuous successes are in the fast food business, most notably, firms such as Starbucks.



TOPIC 3   SCALING & CHANGING SALES FUNNELS OVER TIME

As one develops sales in China, the market segments being tackled are likely to change. Consequently, the communications, sales and distribution channels may change.



Module 3   Making Money in China



TOPIC 1   BUSINESS MODEL

China is the home of some of the most ingenious new business models of the last 20 years. Underlying nearly all of these innovative business models has been the adoption of new technologies such as the internet, mobile phones, digital mapping and GPS.



TOPIC 2   REVENUE MODEL

In this topic, participants are asked to build a cash flow model for their enterprise. The following topics will help you to better understand and determine your likely business costs.

TOPIC 3   COST MODEL

From your cost model, the costs of production, customer acquisition, and salaries, are likely to be a large proportion. The costs of salaries and associated "on costs" are often underestimated by Western firms entering the China market. This topic presents an in-depth analysis of staff salaries and "on costs" in China.



TOPIC 4   FINANCIAL MODEL

This topic explores the likely margin structure of your China operation and its capital requirement.



TOPIC 5   FUNDING

After you have done a rough projection of revenue and costs you will be able to put together a cash flow projection. This, in turn, will enable to make a rough estimate of the total negative cash flow over a period such as the next 18 months. This, in turn, say with a 20% safety margin, will be the amount of capital you will need to deploy to implement your China market entry plan.



Module 4   Building Your China Machine I



TOPIC 1   BRANDING

It is an understatement to say that brand equity in China is important. This topic prompts participants to think about their brand name and what their brand represents in a Chinese context.



TOPIC 2   TEAM BUILDING

Is you develop your China market entry, how will you recruit, manage, and develop the talent of Chinese background, in Australia and China? This topic explains how might you use Australian-based Chinese to assist in the development of your China entry, what stages might you need China-based employees, and respective recruitment processes. It also covers areas such as employment, HR, remuneration and incentives, and differences in work culture.




TOPIC 3   LOGISTICS

For those engaged in the supply of physical products into the Chinese markets, how will you get your physical products from the point of manufacture to Chinese customers (and back)? For those engaged in the produce of services delivered to Chinese customers, what logistical issues arise?




TOPIC 4    INTERNET INFRASTRUCTURE

The internet works in different ways in China and Australia. The mainland Chinese have their own ubiquitous internet services (and their Western equivalents, where they exist, are in some cases banned, or have left the market). This topic details the major differences, licences, regulations and other issues surrounding internet infrastructure.



Module 5   Building Your China Machine II



TOPIC 1   INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND PROTECTION

When it comes to protecting your IP, there are essentially three methods: execute well and move fast, keeping a "secret sauce", and using contracts and intellectual property law.



TOPIC 2   ORGANISATIONAL AND LEGAL STRUCTURING

What organisational or contractual structure will you use to tackle the China market and how will this evolve over time? Some companies will be content with shipping products to China and leave it at that. Others will need to immediately, or in the foreseeable future, address the issue of establishing a local organisation.



TOPIC 3   CHINESE GOVERNMENT REGULATORY AND INCENTIVES ENVIRONMENT

What are the areas of Chinese government, if any, that you will need to engage with, in your business, both as a matter of law, through their purchasing and/or to obtain incentives?



TOPIC 4   DE-RISKING YOUR CHINA MARKET ENTRY

There are numerous risks that a business will face when entering a new market. This topic helps you identify these potential risks and develop plans in order to lower chances of them arising.



Apply now for full access to the course

Get access to all modules, videos, case studies, assignments and more when you sign up for the China Canvas Challenge.

Reserve your spot now to secure your entry into the next program!

"The wealth of knowledge I had access to was incredible. The C3 mentors were always available to answer any questions and I can't imagine where else I could have obtained the amount of relevant and valuable information. By participating, I am now equipped with a more sound business plan and it's given our business the confidence to move forward with our entry into China."

PAULINE CEDDIA  FOUNDER  CRYSTAL HEALTHCARE

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About Us

China Canvas Challenge is part of Haymarket HQ, a not-for-profit organisation supporting startups and SMEs to grow into China.

We have set up, funded and supported hundreds of startups and SMEs in expanding into new markets. 

We developed this program to help other companies do the same using our tried and tested model.

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+61 0426 675 464


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